May 16, 2013
Bike Rumor

Well the folks over at Bike Rumor are really good at it (go figure).  They seem to have uncovered some images that may call into question my good name, and the family friendly atmosphere that Velo Cult has worked hard to encourage.

image

Well, at least we have more fun than any other bike shop, swing by when you’re in town, and we’ll prove it.

April 6, 2013
hbstache:

Makes me think of @THEBOULDERSC #yourdoingitwrong

Rule.

hbstache:

Makes me think of @THEBOULDERSC #yourdoingitwrong

Rule.

December 5, 2012
hbstache:

You wanted us to do socks? WE HAVE DONE SOCKS! 2 versions. Get em at hbstache.com shipping in time for the holidays! #cycling #bicycle #cyclingsocks #mustache #handlebarmustache #moustachesocks #mustachesocks

I must have these.

hbstache:

You wanted us to do socks? WE HAVE DONE SOCKS! 2 versions. Get em at hbstache.com shipping in time for the holidays! #cycling #bicycle #cyclingsocks #mustache #handlebarmustache #moustachesocks #mustachesocks

I must have these.

December 5, 2012
riding bikes, again!

I went for a ride today with Jacob. It was pRITTEy awesome (too much?). For being the first time back on the bike in more than 2 months, I felt really good.  I’m really looking forward to the next season of bike racing, as it is FAST approaching. I have some lofty goals, and will probably be heading to Trinidad in March, and Europe later in the summer, after Elite Track Nationals (not sure which half I’m going to race, but we’ll see how things go)

It also seems as though I’ve got a little power left, which is nice to know. It will be fun to track these numbers as they get back to normal!

November 19, 2012
Hyperbole Systems Inc.

Over the last year or so I’ve been working really hard to make this company a reality.

Paul Day-Hyperbole Systems Inc. Athlete

Well, it finally is, so check it out.

November 3, 2012
Help with Thor

You may have heard, Megan and I came across a bully puppy in the parking lot outside our house that was looking for a home. The other interested party was planning on fighting the little guy, so he came home with us, naturally.  

Here’s the issue; he has Parvovirus.  This, as some of you may know, is a pretty grim prognosis, but we did catch it within hours of him showing symptoms, so that is positive.  The only problem, is all of his treatment is going to be costly.  Normally, we would just grin and bear this, but with my recent accident, more than a month of not working, and nearly $300,000.00 in hospital bills, we just can’t handle it.  If you’ve got a couple of dollars to throw at him, that would be cool, please, just click through to the PayPal link below.

From the bottom of our hearts, Thank you.

October 30, 2012
Humility

For those of you that know me, humble is probably not the first word you would use in a character description. Honestly, it’s probably quite the opposite. I’m pretty ok with that, for the most part, as it has helped me get to where I am, both as an athlete, and a person.  If I didn’t think that I could be the best, why would I bother working so hard at it?

This has all been thrown in sharp relief by the people around me after the accident that left me in the hospital for 2 weeks last month.  Without all of you, I would accomplish very little. It’s not my talent, drive, or hard work that has made this possible; it’s all of you.  

I would like to thank everyone for doing what I can’t, and helping me through this.

October 10, 2012
Well, I never thought I’d get implants, but I suppose these things happen.

On September 15th I had a fairly bad crash at the Encino Velodrome while competing in the Far West Championships, which was called due to weather and fires in the hills surrounding the velodrome immediately after my accident, and rescheduled, indecently. 
I was riding a flying 200m time trial, and my front tire blew out as I crossed the 200m line, at roughly 75kph (this is from the computer on my bike, and am really stoked with this performance, seriously).  I had enough time to look down, and realize what had happened and then think to myself, ‘oh fuck, this is going to hurt so bad’.  
I was ‘fortunate’ enough to stay conscious during the entire event, and as I lay in a heap on the apron, be angry enough to rip my helmet off (if you think helmets don’t work, or that you don’t need one you are an idiot) and throw it at the folks running to assist me.  
I sustained some pretty serious injuries, breaking my scapula into 6 pieces, my clavicle, ribs 1 & 2, and puncturing my left lung, which led to a pneumothorax (air in the chest cavity that your lung is supposed to occupy).  After 3 surgical procedures;
1. Chest tube inserted to allow the air to exit the chest cavity, and my lung to re-inflate and fill the area
2. 2 plates installed on my scapula, resulting in the amazing scar on my back, through the tattoo
3. 1 plate installed on my clavicle, now allowing me into the very popular ‘track cyclists with collar bone plate’ club.
As is the case with most crashes in which the athlete sustains serious injuries, my bike and wheels are fine, only a small dent on the top tube, which we think came from my right leg, and some scratches on the bars.
All of this required a 2 week stay in hospitals, from Fountain Valley, where I was admitted to have the initial clavicle surgery, and my chest tube was installed, to UCI (yeah, it’s ok to laugh, though this one stands for University of California, Irvine, not the other thing) Medical, where the two orthopedic procedures were performed.  For someone that is more active than average, being stuck in a hospital bed for 2 weeks, doped up on pain meds is close to cruel and unusual torture.  Close.
The recovery process for these surgeries, particularly the scapular implants, is very lengthy, as the plates are thin, and the screws holding them in place are (relatively speaking) very small.  Because of this, even small amounts of movement could damage, or loosen the plates, which means, I’ve been home for a couple of weeks, and have spent that time dealing with the pain (believe it or not, having your body torn open does linger a bit) and sitting on the couch watching movies.  Hopefully, if my second follow up appointment goes well, in 2 weeks, I will be allowed to ride a stationary bike, and begin to gain some of my sanity back.
As an unfortunate result of this crash, I missed US Elite Track National Championships at the recently re-christened Velo Sports Center, in Los Angeles.  I would like to congratulate everyone that competed, and thank all of the volunteers, officials, timekeepers, and security personnel that made the event possible.  I will also be unable to race this winter’s UCI World Cup series, as planned, with the BGN Sports Management team.  However, I am planning on heading to Trinidad to race the International Grass Track Competition, as well as the crits associated, this coming March, if my recovery goes according to plan.  We will see how fast I am for this summer’s UCI World Cup Series (yeah, they’re changing the timing of World Cups this year, so we get 2 chances to go race the big, bad euros!)…. 
I would really like to thank everyone that has been positive, helpful, and especially those that have brought me food and spent time with me throughout this ordeal.  You are all very important to me, and I’m certain I wouldn’t be able to make it through without you.
I will (attempt) to keep this more up to date, and keep a progress log of my recovery, rehab, and return to the bike.
Oh, this was sent to me by the hospital, pretty rad, right?

Well, I never thought I’d get implants, but I suppose these things happen.

On September 15th I had a fairly bad crash at the Encino Velodrome while competing in the Far West Championships, which was called due to weather and fires in the hills surrounding the velodrome immediately after my accident, and rescheduled, indecently. 

I was riding a flying 200m time trial, and my front tire blew out as I crossed the 200m line, at roughly 75kph (this is from the computer on my bike, and am really stoked with this performance, seriously).  I had enough time to look down, and realize what had happened and then think to myself, ‘oh fuck, this is going to hurt so bad’.  

I was ‘fortunate’ enough to stay conscious during the entire event, and as I lay in a heap on the apron, be angry enough to rip my helmet off (if you think helmets don’t work, or that you don’t need one you are an idiot) and throw it at the folks running to assist me.  

I sustained some pretty serious injuries, breaking my scapula into 6 pieces, my clavicle, ribs 1 & 2, and puncturing my left lung, which led to a pneumothorax (air in the chest cavity that your lung is supposed to occupy).  After 3 surgical procedures;

1. Chest tube inserted to allow the air to exit the chest cavity, and my lung to re-inflate and fill the area

2. 2 plates installed on my scapula, resulting in the amazing scar on my back, through the tattoo

3. 1 plate installed on my clavicle, now allowing me into the very popular ‘track cyclists with collar bone plate’ club.

As is the case with most crashes in which the athlete sustains serious injuries, my bike and wheels are fine, only a small dent on the top tube, which we think came from my right leg, and some scratches on the bars.

All of this required a 2 week stay in hospitals, from Fountain Valley, where I was admitted to have the initial clavicle surgery, and my chest tube was installed, to UCI (yeah, it’s ok to laugh, though this one stands for University of California, Irvine, not the other thing) Medical, where the two orthopedic procedures were performed.  For someone that is more active than average, being stuck in a hospital bed for 2 weeks, doped up on pain meds is close to cruel and unusual torture.  Close.

The recovery process for these surgeries, particularly the scapular implants, is very lengthy, as the plates are thin, and the screws holding them in place are (relatively speaking) very small.  Because of this, even small amounts of movement could damage, or loosen the plates, which means, I’ve been home for a couple of weeks, and have spent that time dealing with the pain (believe it or not, having your body torn open does linger a bit) and sitting on the couch watching movies.  Hopefully, if my second follow up appointment goes well, in 2 weeks, I will be allowed to ride a stationary bike, and begin to gain some of my sanity back.

As an unfortunate result of this crash, I missed US Elite Track National Championships at the recently re-christened Velo Sports Center, in Los Angeles.  I would like to congratulate everyone that competed, and thank all of the volunteers, officials, timekeepers, and security personnel that made the event possible.  I will also be unable to race this winter’s UCI World Cup series, as planned, with the BGN Sports Management team.  However, I am planning on heading to Trinidad to race the International Grass Track Competition, as well as the crits associated, this coming March, if my recovery goes according to plan.  We will see how fast I am for this summer’s UCI World Cup Series (yeah, they’re changing the timing of World Cups this year, so we get 2 chances to go race the big, bad euros!)…. 

I would really like to thank everyone that has been positive, helpful, and especially those that have brought me food and spent time with me throughout this ordeal.  You are all very important to me, and I’m certain I wouldn’t be able to make it through without you.

I will (attempt) to keep this more up to date, and keep a progress log of my recovery, rehab, and return to the bike.

Oh, this was sent to me by the hospital, pretty rad, right?

July 17, 2012
Absenteeism.

so, a lot has happened in the last 4 months, and I’ve been relatively (completely) absent from this media.  however, here is a brief run down of what’s been going on.

I went to Europe to work for the Canadian Paracycling team for their road world cup project. I flew into Brussels, Belgium where I picked up a sweet 9 passenger Mercedes van.  I immediately drove it to Piacenza, Italy where I met the team, and we stayed for about 10 days, during which the team raced the Piacenza Paracycling UCI event.  The drive was amazing, although attempting to navigate 1000 km without a map or GPS was difficult at times….. 

From There, we drove to Rome, Italy, where we stayed for just 4 days, enough time to get in the first of 3 Paracycling World Cup races. It was awesome, but a little too short.

After Rome, the driving continued, to Antibes, France, Sailles de Bearnes, France, then Segovia, Spain, for the second World Cup event.  The race used a castle (yup, a castle) as the start/finish and staging area for all the teams, this was pretty cool. 

We did stay at the most metal hotel ever. This is in the lobby.

After this event, we drove (!) to London for the Paralympic pre-event at the legendary Brands Hatch race circuit.  The course was super fun, each team was based in one of the garages (pronounced properly British, if you please) where you had a great view of a lot of the course, and plenty of shelter from typical English weather.

All in all, the 6 weeks, and 7000 km of driving (seriously, if I never drive again, I won’t be super bummed out about it) I returned home, and realized that not riding my bike or lifting weights for 6 weeks made me fat, light (I lost 18 lbs!!!), slow, and pretty weak.

But, that’s ok; there’s still a bunch of time until USAC Elite National Track Championships, and I am terribly motivated to get fit again, and start moving my bike, which I did a little of up at the Alpenrose AVC this past weekend.

Also, upon my return, I found waiting for me all of the equipment I need to begin repair and production of custom, full composite bikes for Ritte Van Vlaanderen.  This is pretty awesome, and we are all very much looking forward to the amazingness that will come from these simple tools.  The first custom bike is probably going to be around at Interbike, but repairs are happening now.  If you’ve got a bike that is a little less intact than you’d like, and would like to ride it again, let me know, I’ll take a look and make sure it’s a reasonable repair and, if it is, get it back to you quick as I can!

Now, it’s time for me to go for a quick road ride, got to get fit so I can keep looking good for everyone that has helped me out on this amazing journey.

March 26, 2012
Party!

Everybody loves to party, you should come do it with us this friday!  Orange 20, Moth Attack Cycles, and the beautiful men and women of Ritte Racing!

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